The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

When it comes to food, Michelin stars are synonymous with quality. They’re awarded to the best and most consistent restaurants in the world. For diners, that’s a distinction that usually comes with a price. Most of the restaurants in the Michelin guide are upscale establishments so a Michelin-starred meal usually meant higher prices. But not anymore.

When Ren told me that Michelin Hong Kong included a street food section in this year’s guide, I knew exactly what our trip would be about. Ren and I love street food, especially when we travel, so the prospect of having Michelin-recommended street food in a culinary city like Hong Kong was a dream come true. We made it our mission to visit all 23 recommendations and come up with this guide.

To be clear, the street food stalls in this guide haven’t been awarded any Michelin stars. Some of them aren’t even true street food stalls. Reserved it seems for smaller establishments that haven’t done enough to earn an actual star, they’re recommended by Michelin Hong Kong as part of the guide’s first ever street food section.

NOTE: Not everyone can visit all 23 places on this list so I’ve grouped them by location to make it easier for you. Many are worth trying but if you only had time to visit a few, then we recommend the ones in Tsim Sha Tsui. They were our favorites. If you scroll down to the end of the list, you’ll find a link that will take you to our Hong Kong / Macau itinerary on Sygic Travel. It’ll pinpoint exactly where each eatery is on a map. You can also download our itinerary in editable Word format by subscribing to our newsletter via the signup form at the bottom of this post.

STREET FOOD STALLS BY AREA

  1. Tsim Sha Tsui
  2. Mong Kok
  3. Jordan
  4. Wan Chai
  5. North Point
  1. Sham Shui Po
  2. Tsuen Wan
  3. Kowloon City
  4. Tai Kok Tsui

Tsim Sha Tsui

1. Cheung Hing Kee 祥興記 (荃灣)

Cheung Hing Kee is known for these sheng jian bao which are Shanghainese pan-fried buns. Like their more famous cousins the xiao long bao, they’re filled with pork and hot soup but their coating is thicker and their bottoms are charred and crisp. We tried two kinds — the shrimp and the black truffle. I think you know where this is headed. 😉
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

The shrimp was delicious but the black truffle was to die for. You can see it sandwiched between the pork and the wrapper below. You get an explosion of earthy truffle flavor each time you take a bite. It was so good and one of our favorite things to eat from this list.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Cheung Hing Kee doesn’t have any tables but they do have a countertop with a few stools out front. They used to have a branch in Tsuen Wan as well but the owners had to close it down because of the Michelin curse. 🙁
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Cheung Hing Kee 祥興記 (荃灣)

Address: 48 Lock Road, Tsim Sha Tsui
Operating Hours: 10AM-10PM daily
What to Order: Shanghainese pan-fried buns (filled with moist soupy pork), dumplings, vermicelli soup, and soya bean milk
What We Paid: HKD 48 for two shrimp and two black truffle pan-fried buns
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Tsim Sha Tsui station (Exit A2). Walk west on Haiphong Rd then make a left on Lock Rd. Cheung Hing Kee will be on your left.

2. Fat Boy 第三代肥仔

Like Cheung Hing Kee, Fat Boy was one of our favorites. They serve skewers of soy-marinated octopus, beef tongue, pig intestines, gizzard, and duck stomach.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

A bouquet of deliciousness. They slather their food with horseradish to give it extra kick. The textures were wonderful and the offal tasted nice and clean. Yum yum yum!
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

There’s no seating at Fat Boy so it’s good their food is easy to eat. A true hole in the wall, you can just grab a stick (or two) and go.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Fat Boy 第三代肥仔

Address: Shop G1, G/F, Workingport Commercial Building, 3 Hau Fook Street, Tsim Sha Tsui
Operating Hours: 1PM-12MN
What to Order: Sticks of octopus, beef tongue, pig intestines, gizzard, duck stomach
What We Paid: HKD 102 for eleven or twelve skewers
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Tsim Sha Tsui station (Exit A2). Walk east on Humphreys Ave then make a left on Carnarvon Rd. Walk straight then make a right on Hau Fook St. Fat Boy will be on your right.

3. Mammy Pancake 媽咪雞蛋仔

Egg waffles don’t seem that complicated to make so I was surprised to find two egg waffle places on Michelin’s list. But as Ren’s local cousin pointed out, it’s all in the texture and not many places can do it right. We tried two flavors here at Mammy Pancake — coffee and green tea. Both were outstanding and extremely addictive. I was already full by the time we got here but I couldn’t stop popping these things into my mouth!
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Mammy Pancake egg waffles are crisp on the outside but light and fluffy on the inside. It was like eating a crispy green tea cloud. *sigh*
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

The Mammy Pancake stall is so small that you can easily miss it. In fact, we almost did! We walked right past it and stopped only when I got a whiff of that heavenly waffle/pancake smell. 😆 As you can see from this picture, the place is popular so be prepared to wait a few minutes for your egg waffle.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Mammy Pancake 媽咪雞蛋仔

Address: 8-12 Carnarvon Road, Tsim Sha Tsui
Operating Hours: 11AM-11PM daily
What to Order: Egg waffles
What We Paid: HKD 22 for two egg waffles
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Tsim Sha Tsui station (Exit A2). Walk east on Humphreys Ave then make a sharp right on Carnarvon Rd. Mammy Pancake will be on your right.

Mong Kok

4. Joyful Dessert House

Joyful Dessert House is known for their desserts of which three are Michelin recommended — Mango Napoloeon (pictured below), green tea lava cake with matcha ice cream, and sorbet with grilled pineapple.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

The mango Napoleon was delicious but this matcha lava cake is what we’d come back for again and again. Stick your spoon in the cake and this river of green tea lava just oozes out. So good with the ice cream and fresh berries!
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Joyful Dessert House was one of the bigger eateries on this list and probably more a cafe than a street food stall.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Joyful Dessert House

Address: Shop 2 & 3, G/F.74 Hak Po Steet, Mongkok
Operating Hours: 3PM-2AM daily
What to Order: Mango Napoloeon, green tea lava cake with ice cream, sorbet with grilled pineapple
What We Paid: HKD 121 for two desserts
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Mong Kok station (Exit E2). Walk south on Nathan Rd then make a left on Shantung St. Walk straight then make a right on Hak Po St. Joyful Dessert House will be on your left.

5. Kee Tsui 奇趣餅家

Kee Tsui is a bakery that sells Chinese pastries and cookies for takeaway.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Most popular it seemed were these fish-shaped cookies and pastries filled with red bean.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

The stream of people buying pastries was endless! The store sign is in Chinese only so be sure look for the street address.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Kee Tsui 奇趣餅家

Address: 135 Fa Yuen Street, Mong Kok
Operating Hours: 8AM-8PM daily
What to Order: Cantonese pastries, cookies
What We Paid: Around HKD 5-10 per pastry
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Mong Kok station (Exit B3). Walk north on Sai Yeung Choi St then make a right on Mong Kok Rd. Walk straight then make a left on Fa Yuen St. Kee Tsui will be on your left.

6. Three Potatoes叁薯

One of the few non-Chinese stalls on this list, Three Potatoes sells potato-based snacks like baked potatoes, French fries, and potato hash.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

This fried onion and bacon hash brown was really good. It’s texture was different from the usual hash brown and you could really taste the slivers of onion and chunks of bacon.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

The Three Potatoes stall is located in a busy area of Mong Kok. It doesn’t have any seating so you’ll need to eat as you go.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Three Potatoes叁薯

Address: Shop 5, 6/F, 30-32A Nullah Road, Mong Kok
Operating Hours: 12NN-9PM daily
What to Order: Baked potatoes, French fries, potato hash
What We Paid: HKD 30 for one fried onion and bacon hash brown
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Prince Edward station (Exit B2). Walk south on Sai Yeung Choi St then make a left on Nullah Rd. Three Potatoes will be close to the corner of Nullah Rd and Tung Choi St.

Jordan

7. Block 18 Doggie’s Noodle 十八座 狗仔粉

This place was near Ren’s cousin’s house so it was the first thing we tried. They’re known for these bowls of springy noodles made with shrimp, mushroom, dried radish, and fried pork fat. It was so damn tasty! We loved the texture of the noodles and the bits of pork fat were delicious.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Like the bowl of springy noodles, this came highly recommended and was really good too. It looked to be some type of fish cake noodle soup.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Open 24 hrs, Block 18 Doggie’s Noodle is near the Temple Street night market so it’s a good place for some late night chow.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Block 18 Doggie’s Noodle 十八座 狗仔粉

Address: 27A Ning Po Street, Jordan 佐敦寧波街27A號G/F
Operating Hours: 24 hrs
What to Order: Springy noodles cooked with shrimp, mushrooms, dried radish and fried pork fat
What We Paid: HKD 30 per bowl
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Jordan station (Exit B1). Walk north on Nathan Rd then make a left on Ning Po St. Walk straight then make a right on Parkes St. Block 18 Doggie’s Noodle will be on your right.

8. Kai Kai 佳佳甜品

Kai Kai is a dessert shop that offers many types of Cantonese desserts like these glutinous rice dumplings in ginger sweet soup and stewed papaya with white fungus and rock sugar. How exotic!
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

The stewed papaya was ok but the rice dumplings were really good. The soup had a strong ginger taste and the mochi-like balls were filled with black sesame. Very interesting!
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Kai Kai is located just around the corner from Block 18 Doggie’s Noodle.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Kai Kai 佳佳甜品

Address: 121-123 Parkes Street, Jordan
Operating Hours: 12NN-4AM daily
What to Order: Glutinous rice dumplings in ginger sweet soup, stewed papaya with rock sugar
What We Paid: HKD 38 for two desserts
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Jordan station (Exit B1). Walk north on Nathan Rd then make a left on Ning Po St. Kai Kai will be on your right.

Wan Chai

9. Butcher’s Club

Cheeseburgers are my comfort food so I was happy to find a burger joint on this list. Butchers Club makes their burgers with dry-aged Black Angus beef from Australia.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Their burgers are delicious albeit a little pricey (starts at HKD 100). The patty was so juicy and flavorful!
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Butchers Club is a small but stylish space that started off as a butcher’s shop in Aberdeen.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Butcher’s Club

Address: G/F, Rialto Building, 2 Landale St, Wan Chai
Operating Hours: 8AM-11PM daily
What to Order: Cheeseburgers made using signature dry-aged Black Angus beef from Australia
What We Paid: HKD 100 for the basic cheeseburger
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Wan Chai station (Exit A3). Walk west on Johnston Rd then make a left on Landale St. Butchers Club will be on your left.

10. Kelly’s Cape Bop

A Korean eatery, Kelly’s Cape Bop is known for its Korean fried chicken, tteokbokki, and kimbap. We shared one box of Korean fried chicken which had a few pieces of tteokbokki.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Kelly’s Cape Bop doesn’t have any tables but there are a few standing-only counters inside.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Kelly’s Cape Bop

Address: 57 Johnston Road, Wan Chai
Operating Hours: 11AM-9PM daily
What to Order: Korean fried chicken, tteokbokki, kimbap
What We Paid: HKD 50 for one box of chicken and tteokbokki
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Wan Chai station (Exit A3). Walk west on Johnston Rd. Kelly’s Cape Bop will be on your right near the corner of Johnston Rd and Ship St.

11. Keung Kee 強記

Keung Kee is known for their rice rolls, sweet soup, and glutinous rice with Chinese sausage.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Keung Kee looks like an authentic Hong Kong street food stall. There’s a small room at the back with a few tables.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Keung Kee 強記

Address: 382 Lockhart Road, Wan Chai
Operating Hours: 12NN-1AM daily
What to Order: Glutinous rice with Chinese sausage, rice rolls, sweet soup
What We Paid: HKD 35 for one bowl of glutinous rice with Chinese sausage
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Causeway Bay station (Exit C). Walk east on Lockhart Rd. Keung Kee will be near the corner of Lockhart Rd and Marsh Rd.

North Point

12. Lei Keung Kee 利強記

The second of two egg waffle places on this list, Lei Keung Kee’s waffles were just as good as Mammy Pancake’s except theirs was a little more hollow. Unless I’m mistaken, they only serve theirs plain as well.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Literally, a hole in the wall. 😆
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Lei Keung Kee 利強記

Address: 492 King’s Road, North Point
Operating Hours: 10AM-11PM daily
What to Order: Egg waffles
What We Paid: HKD 17 per order
How to Get There: Take the MTR to North Point station (Exit B3). Walk east on King’s Rd. Lei Keung Kee will be on the corner of King’s Rd and Kam Hong St.

13. Mak Kee 麥記美食

Mak Kee is known for their pan-fried dumplings, xiao long bao, and fish balls. If you can’t take too much heat in your food, then be sure to tell them to go easy on the sauce because it’s spicy!
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Mak Kee is one of the many stalls on this list that has a Chinese-only sign, so it pays to have the street address and Chinese characters handy. You can’t see it here but there are a few sidewalk tables by the side of the road where you can sit down and eat your food.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Mak Kee 麥記美食

Address: 21-23 Fort Street, North Point
Operating Hours: 11AM-11PM daily
What to Order: Pan-fried dumplings, Xiao long bao, Fish ball
What We Paid: HKD 16 for one order each of dumplings and fish balls
How to Get There: Take the MTR to North Point station (Exit B1). Walk west on King’s Rd then make a left on N View St. Mak Kee will be on your left.

14. Tonkla Thai Snack 迦南泰國小食

This Thai eatery was really good. They serve many Thai dishes but based on what I’ve read, they’re known for their tom yum noodles, pad Thai, and green curry chicken. These pad Thai noodles were some of the best we’ve had in a long time.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

The green curry was really good too, very creamy and not too spicy. Ugh, I’m getting hungry right now just by looking at this! 😆
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Tonkla Thai Snack is located across the street from the Java Road Municipal Services Building, which is home to Tung Po Restaurant. Tonkla used to be called Canaan Thai Snack but the name was changed after the restaurant changed hands.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Tonkla Thai Snack 迦南泰國小食

Address: Shop D2, G/F 72 Java Road, North Point
Operating Hours: 12NN-9PM daily
What to Order: Tom yum noodles, Pad Thai, Green curry chicken
What We Paid: HKD 100 for one pad Thai and one green curry chicken
How to Get There: Take the MTR to North Point station (Exit A1). Walk west on Java Rd. Tonkla Thai Snack will be on your left.

Sham Shui Po

15. Hop Yik Tai 合益泰小食

Hop Yik Tai serves these delicious slippery rice rolls known as cheung fun. They’re slippery smooth with a wonderful gummy texture. It was so good I could eat this for days!
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

We cam early in the morning and already there was a queue forming.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Hop Yik Tai 合益泰小食

Address: 121 Kweilin St, Sham Shui Po
Operating Hours: 6:30AM-8:30PM
What to Order: Slippery smooth rice rolls known as cheung fun
What We Paid: HKD 7 per order
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Sham Shui Po station (Exit C2). Walk southwest on Kweilin St. Hop Yik Tai will be on your right.

16. Kung Wo Tofu 公和荳品廠

If you like tofu, then you’re going to love this place. As their name suggests, they specialize in all things tofu like tofu pudding, pan-fried tofu, and homemade soy milk. There’s the tofu man bringing sexy back. 😛
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

You can have the tofu pudding chilled or hot. We had ours chilled and it was delicious. I don’t know what it was but on the table was an orange powder that you could sprinkle on the tofu for some sweetness. The pan-fried tofu was good as well and the soy milk was very refreshing. I wouldn’t mind having this for breakfast everyday.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Like several places on this list, Kung Wo Tofu feels like a legit Hong Kong street food stall.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Kung Wo Tofu 公和荳品廠

Address: 118 Pei Ho Street, Sham Shui Po
Operating Hours: 7AM-9PM
What to Order: Tofu pudding, pan-fried tofu, homemade soy milk
What We Paid: HKD 28 for one tofu pudding, one bowl of pan-fried tofu, and one small soy milk
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Sham Shui Po station (Exit B2). Walk northeast on Pei Ho St. Kung Wo Tofu will be on your right.

17. Kwan Kee Store 坤記糕品

This was the only place among the 23 that we didn’t get to try, but it wasn’t from a lack of effort. We went on three occasions but it was closed every time! We were in Hong Kong the week of the Mid-Autumn Festival and unbeknownst to us, the shop had closed for the week. Of course, we didn’t think of asking someone what that red sign on their door meant until after our third attempt. 👿 Unless I’m mistaken, they’re known for takeaway Chinese pastries and desserts similar to Kee Tsui in Mong Kok.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Kwan Kee Store 坤記糕品

Address: 115-117 Fuk Wa Street, Sham Shui Po
Operating Hours: 8AM-11PM
What to Order: Chinese rice pudding, black sesame rolls
Cost: About HKD 5-10 per order
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Sham Shui Po station (Exit B2). Walk northeast on Pei Ho St. Kwan Kee Store will be on the corner of Pei Ho St and Fuk Wa St.

Tsuen Wan

18. Chin Sik 千色車仔麵

If you like Hong Kong cart noodles, then this place is for you. You choose what type of noodle you want then decide what toppings to go with it . The pig intestines and skin are highly recommended.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Ren and her cousin Brooke really enjoyed these bowls of cart noodles. They tasted super clean. I’ve never had big pieces of pig skin or chicharon served with noodles like this before. Very interesting.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Chin Sik is a long narrow space with a few tables inside and outside.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Chin Sik 千色車仔麵

Address: 49 Shiu Wo Street, Tsuen Wan
Operating Hours: 11AM-10PM daily
What to Order: Hong Kong cart noodles with pig intestines, pig skin, and other toppings
What We Paid: HKD 78 for two bowls with drinks
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Tsuen Wan station (Exit B1). Walk southwest and make your way to Castle Peak Rd. Make a left on Castle Peak Rd then make a right on Chung On St. Make a left on Shiu Wo St and Chin Sik will be on your right.

19. Wing On 榮安小食

Like Chin Sik, Wing On is known for their cart noodles which you can top with chicken wing tips among other ingredients.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

You can slather it with a curry-like sauce that’s very spicy so be careful! The ladies behind the counter had a good laugh watching Ren explode into a fit of hacking from all the heat. 😆 Because of the sauce, the noodles here taste sweeter and more curry-like than the ones at Chin Sik.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Another authentic Hong Kong hole in the wall.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Wing On 榮安小食

Address: G/F, 24B Tai Ho Road, Tsuen Wan
Operating Hours: 11AM-12MN daily
What to Order: Hong Kong cart noodles with chicken wing tips and other toppings
What We Paid: HKD 36 for one bowl of noodles and three chicken wings
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Tsuen Wan station (Exit D). Walk southwest on Tai Ho Rd. Wing On will be on your right.

Kowloon City

20. Lan Ying 蘭英印尼小食

Lan Ying serves different types of Indonesian satay and nasi goreng.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

We went for the set meal that came with your choice of two proteins, rice, and a drink.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

This place was hard to find because the address is misleading. It says it’s on Fuk Lo Tsun Road but it’s actually on Carpenter Road between Fuk Lo Tsun and Lion Rock Roads. There’s a counter with seats in the alley.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Lan Ying 蘭英印尼小食

Address: 92-84 Fuk Lo Tsun Road
Operating Hours: 11AM-12MN
What to Order: Satay, nasi goreng
What We Paid: HKD 33 for one meal set
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Lok Fu station (Exit B). Walk southwest on Wang Tau Hom E Rd then make a left on Junction Rd. Walk all the way down Junction Rd then make a left on Carpenter Rd. Lan Ying will be on your right. This is a long walk so you may want to use Grab or Uber from Lok Fu station.

21. Wah Yuan 華園甜品

Like Kai Kai in Jordan, Wah Yuan serves Cantonese desserts. They don’t have an English menu so we just pointed at the posters on their walls. 😆 We enjoyed the black sesame balls from Kai Kai so much that we chose to have them here as well. They were just as good.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

This was awesome too. Not sure how Cantonese this is but it’s a durian bingsu that really did taste like durian. So good and refreshing!
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Thank god for all those posters! 😆
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Wah Yuan 華園甜品

Address: G/F, 38 Shung Ling Street, San Po Kong
What to Order: Cantonese desserts
What We Paid: HKD 56 for two desserts
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Lok Fu station (Exit B). Make your way east to Fung Mo St. Walk southeast on Fung Mo St then make a left on Tung Tau Tsuen Rd. Make a right on Tai Shing St and cross the river until it becomes Tseuk Luk St. Make a right on Shung Ling St. Wah Yuan will be on your right. This is a long walk so you may want to use Grab or Uber from Lok Fu station.

22. Ying Kee 英記美點小食

Ying Kee specializes in wonton noodles but unfortunately, the person who makes them was out that day. The restaurant was too far to return to the next day so we settled for the dumplings and slippery rice rolls. They were very good, especially these vegetable and pork dumplings.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

These slippery rice rolls were good but not as good as the ones at Hop Yik Tai in Sham Shui Po.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

There’s the wonton noodle kiosk behind the carts. If you visit Ying Kee, I suggest going for the wonton noodles because that’s what they’re known for. The lady who served us was super nice. She gave us a free taste of their delicious soy milk. 🙂
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Ying Kee 英記美點小食

Address: G/F, Shop 10, Hong Keung Mansion, 32-34 Hong Keung, San Po Kong
Operating Hours: 11AM-12MN daily
What to Order: Wonton noodles
What We Paid: HKD 21 for one order each of dumplings and slippery rice rolls
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Lok Fu station (Exit B). Make your way east to Fung Mo St. Walk southeast on Fung Mo St then make a left on Tung Tau Tsuen Rd. Make a right on Tai Shing St and cross the river until it becomes Tseuk Luk St. Make a right on Shung Ling St then make a left on Yi Lun St. Make a right on Hong Keung St. Ying Kee will be on your right. This is a long walk so you may want to use Grab or Uber from Lok Fu station.

Tai Kok Tsui

23. Soupreme湯品小棧

This was for us the most interesting eatery on this list. Known for their soups, you first choose a soup base, each of which has its own unique health benefits. Some aid in digestion while others enhance immunity for example. You then choose your side dishes and a staple which is either rice or noodles. For our staples, we went with the cold chicken wings and dried bean curd with walnut flowers. How exotic!
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

We shared one set between us and ordered two drinks. I had the almond drink while Ren went with some exotic new-agey buckwheat concoction. 😆
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Soupreme is a nice but tiny restaurant with just 3-4 small tables. Though the MTR takes you on a long loop to get here, you can actually walk to the Tai Kok Tsui area to and from Mong Kok.
The Michelin Hong Kong Street Food Guide

Soupreme湯品小棧

Address: G/F, 20 Beech St, Tai Kok Tsui
Operating Hours: 12NN-9PM, closed Sundays
What to Order: Cantonese double-boiled soups
What We Paid: HKD 103 for one set
How to Get There: Take the MTR to Olympic station (Exit C5). Walk northeast on Cherry St. Make a sharp left on Tai Kok Tsui Rd then make an immediate right on Beech St. Soupreme will be on your right.

* * * * *

If pictures aren’t enough to whet your appetite, here’s a video of all 23 street food recommendations.

It was fun chasing after these eateries but it did have its share of challenges. For one, they’re scattered throughout Hong Kong. They may not look that far apart on a map but they often are! Some are several minutes’ walk from the nearest MTR station so you may have to use Grab or Uber if too much walking isn’t your thing. On top of that, some are tiny and hard to spot with signs entirely in Chinese, so it’s important to print out the characters for their Chinese names as well as their exact addresses. A smartphone with pocket wifi and GPS will be extremely helpful. And of course, overeating was a threat so we always shared meals to leave room for the next stall. 😆

You can refer to our 7-day Hong Kong / Macau itinerary on Sygic Travel to see exactly where each stall/restaurant is on a map. It includes all the attractions we visited in Hong Kong and Macau as well (yes, we did some sightseeing on this trip too. 😆 ). Sygic Travel is a free travel planning app that I use to plan all our trips. You can read more about it by going to my Sygic Travel post.

To make it even easier for you, you can download a copy of our Hong Kong / Macau eat-inerary in editable Word format by subscribing to our newsletter below. It includes each stall’s address, name in Chinese, closest MTR station, specialty, and estimated cost. You’ll receive the download link via email shortly after as you click “subscribe”.

Thanks for reading and have an awesome time trying Michelin Hong Kong’s street food recommendations! 😀

For travel tips to Hong Kong, check out our Food-Lover’s Travel Guide to Hong Kong

The Food-Lover's Travel Guide to Hong Kong

JB Macatulad

JB Macatulad

JB is one half of Will Fly for Food and its chief itinerary maker.  He's the one to blame for all the crappy photos and verbal diarrhea on this blog.  Don't listen to him.
JB Macatulad


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