Ox Cheek Stew with Risoni

Ox Cheek Stew with Risoni

I‘ve frequently heralded my mother-in-law as the source of Ren’s culinary prowess, so I’m happy to include, for the first time, one of her Rosielicious Recipes here at Sushi Bytes.

Inspired by the entree she enjoyed at her recent birthday luncheon at Katré Mediterranean Restaurant, she whipped up this fantastic ox cheek stew served on a bed of risoni pasta. One bite from these amazingly tender and glutinous slow braised ox cheeks and you’ll know instantly from where Ren gets her talent.

Hopefully this inaugural post will be the first of many Rosielicious guest appearances. 😉

Ox Cheek Stew with Risoni‏‏

Ox Cheek Stew with Risoni‏‏

Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 450-500 g ox cheeks
  • 2-3 Tbsps cooking oil
  • garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 medium onions, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 2 medium carrots, peeled and sliced
  • 1/2 tsp ground allspice or mixed spice
  • 1/2 tsp mace
  • 1 1/2 Tbsps plain flour
  • Whole peppercorns
  • Cayenne pepper
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 300 ml beef stock
  • 1 bottle Cerveza Negra or any dark ale
  • 1 Tbsp dark brown sugar
  • Large glug of worcetershire sauce
  • 1-2 Tbsps malt vinegar
  • Salt

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 275 degrees F.
  2. Cut beef into small cubes. Heat oil in frying pan, then fry cubes quickly until lightly browned. Transfer to casserole.
  3. In same oil, cook onion until starting to soften, then add carrots and cook for a few more minutes. Stir in allspice and flour, then add stock and beer and gradually bring to a boil. Stir in brown sugar and 1 Tbsp vinegar, add bay leaf, then put lid on casserole and cook on low heat for about 2 1/2 – 3 hours until meat is tender.
  4. Check and stir stew from time to time, turning heat down if it appears to be cooking too fast. Open lid halfway if sauce needs reducing. When meat is cooked, taste and add more vinegar and extra splash of beer if needed.

DID YOU KNOW?

That risoni in Latin means “big rice?” Also known as Orzo which is Italian for “barley,” it’s a form of pasta shaped like a large grain of rice, slightly smaller than a pine nut. Because of its shape, it’s also referred to at times as “Italian rice.”

Original Source

JB Macatulad

JB Macatulad

JB is one half of Will Fly for Food and its chief itinerary maker.  He's the one to blame for all the crappy photos and verbal diarrhea on this blog.  Don't listen to him.
JB Macatulad


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