Ren’s Japanese Fried Rice ala Kimpura with Chicken Teriyaki

Ren’s Japanese Fried Rice ala Kimpura with Chicken Teriyaki

Like many of our contemporaries who grew up in the 70s and 80s, Ren and I fondly remember Kimpura as THE restaurant to go to to celebrate a special occasion or event. Whether it be a graduation, birthday, or anniversary, Kimpura was always at the top of our list.

One of the many things we loved about Kimpura, aside from their unparalleled ebi tempura, was their equally delicious fried rice. Cooked in front of you teppanyaki style, I always marveled at how adeptly, and with so much panache, the chef would flip, crack, toss, mix and scrape all the ingredients into these perfect, steaming little bowls of fried rice.

Ren, the budding gourmet at 8, was more keen in her observation, noting each ingredient and its corresponding amount with every visit. The beautiful bowl of fried rice that you see before you is the culmination of all those years (and special occasions) of quiet, but telling, captivation.

Oh, and yeah, her chicken teriyaki kicks ass too. 🙂

Ren's Japanese Fried Rice ala Kimpura with Chicken Teriyaki‏‏

The viand isn’t always the star.
Ren's Japanese Fried Rice ala Kimpura with Chicken Teriyaki

The willing and gracious supporting player
Ren's Japanese Fried Rice ala Kimpura with Chicken Teriyaki

Ren's Japanese Fried Rice ala Kimpura with Chicken Teriyaki

These last 2 photos were taken on the second day, after Ren had added a slurry (corn starch and water mixture) to the teriyaki sauce, making it thicker and more syrupy. This is the teriyaki sauce consistency that’s more commonly seen in restaurants. I much prefer the less sweet and more authentic version from the night before.
Ren's Japanese Fried Rice ala Kimpura with Chicken Teriyaki

Ren's Japanese Fried Rice ala Kimpura with Chicken Teriyaki

Ingredients

FOR THE JAPANESE FRIED RICE

  • 5 cups day-old, cooked japanese rice
  • 2 Tbsps butter
  • 1 Tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 small carrot, finely diced
  • 1 cup baguio beans, finely chopped
  • 1/4 kilo lean ground pork
  • 1/3 cup kikkoman or any premium soy sauce
  • 1/3 cup mirin
  • Splash of sake or rice wine
  • 1 large egg
  • Salt and white pepper, to taste
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 large white onion, minced

FOR THE CHICKEN TERIYAKI

  • 230 grams or 1/4 kilo boneless chicken thighs
  • Vegetable oil
  • Garlic cloves
  • 1/4 medium bunch of broccoli, steamed
  • 1/4 large carrot, cut into chunks. steamed
  • 1/4 cup plus 2 Tbsps mirin
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup sake or rice wine
  • White pepper
  • Salt
  • Flour

Directions

FOR THE JAPANESE FRIED RICE

  1. Heat butter and vegetable in a large wok or skillet. Add onions, garlic, carrot, beans and cook til soft.
  2. Add ground pork; season with salt and white pepper, and stir-fry until no longer pink.
  3. Add cooked rice, soy sauce and mirin and mix well. splash on sake or rice wine and continue to mix.
  4. Adjust seasoning to taste. break egg on top of rice mixture and keep mixing until well combined and egg is cooked.
  5. Serve on individual bowls or a large serving platter.

FOR THE CHICKEN TERIYAKI

  1. Sprinkle a little white pepper and salt on both sides of the chicken breast. Coat with a bit of flour.
  2. To make teriyaki sauce, mix soy sauce with mirin.
  3. Place a few pieces of unwrapped garlic on skillet with generous amount of vegetable oil on low heat so it will not burn. Stir occasionally and cook for a few minutes and then remove.
  4. Pan fry chicken in skillet for about 4-5 minutes on medium heat and then flip and cook other side for another 2 minutes.
  5. Momentarily set aside chicken and discard oil. Put chicken back in pan.
  6. When fully cooked, pour in sake or rice wine into skillet to flash or flambé chicken. Be careful not to stand close to pan. Let sake/rice wine reduce by more than half.
  7. Add in teriyaki sauce and reduce until thick.
  8. Remove chicken pieces and cut into strips. Place broccoli and carrots on plate, followed by cut chicken, then pour teriyaki sauce over chicken.

DID YOU KNOW?

That Kimpura has been in business for over 40 years? Since they first opened their doors on October 10, 1970 at what was then known as the Makati Commercial Center, they have set the bar for Japanese restaurants in the Philippines, often being credited for bringing Japanese cuisine to the mainstream.

Original Source

JB Macatulad

JB Macatulad

JB is one half of Will Fly for Food and its chief itinerary maker.  He's the one to blame for all the crappy photos and verbal diarrhea on this blog.  Don't listen to him.
JB Macatulad


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